Weekly Rights Review: Math on Facebook, Race in Schools, and Justin Amash

March 29, 2013

Did all your Facebook friends turn into math fans this week?

If you find the = sign all over Facebook profile pics this week, know that it’s a show of support for the marriage equality cases debated in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday and Wednesday.

But this week, we weren't only focused on the crucial LGBT rights arguments, but also on issues of privacy, race-conscious admissions and (our favorite) drones.

Michigan News

Much Ado About AMASH
On Monday, Representative Justin Amash (R, 3rd District) joined ACLU Executive Director Kary Moss at Taking Liberties, the kickoff of a year-long Western Speaker Series in Grand Rapids.

Rep. Amash shares a passion for defending our individual civil liberties and privacy rights against the government's increasing emphasis on surveillance and indefinite detention in the name of national security.

While the discussion focused on criticism of the PATRIOT Act and the ongoing targeted assassination drone program, there were a few unexpected twists (of course!). Read more about the event over at MLive.

Playing Whack-a-Mole with Prop 2
Since 2006, we've been challenging Michigan's Proposition 2, which eliminates the consideration of race in university admissions despite the fact that such admissions policies have been upheld by U.S. Supreme Court.

Along with our coalition partners, students, and faculty from the University of Michigan, we struck down Prop 2 as it forces supporters of admissions policies that include students from diverse backgrounds to hit the streets with petitions to amend the Michigan Constitution before they can have the same chance as other groups.

But that didn’t stop Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette from vowing to take the case to the Supreme Court of the United States. This Monday, March 25, the nation’s highest court added the case to their docket for October 2013.

Need some background on the case? Listen to our Racial Justice Project Staff Attorney explain the case to WDET's Pat Batcheller

National News

Marriage Equality – Will the Supreme Court Reflect a Changing America?
Listen, this doesn’t always happen…So let’s enjoy the fact that this time, a clear majority of America is on the side of civil liberties, equality, and progress.

Polls clearly show that most Americans are in favor of increasing marriage rights for same-sex couples. Recently, a number of staunchly anti-gay-rights politicians have recently changed their minds on the issue – many after learning of close family members who’ve come out.

LGBT rights are not only correct in principle – they are also in line with what most Americans say they want. Even expert statistian Nate Silver says so!

This week, the Supreme Court heard arguments on two cases that will undoubtedly be touchstone cases for the future of gay rights in America. We've got our finger's crossed, but we know that history is on our side. After all, we're firmly on Team Edie