Driving While Black

ACLU of Michigan ED Kary Moss Issues Statement on Dallas Shootings

ACLU of Michigan ED Kary Moss Issues Statement on Dallas Shootings

2016-07-08 00:00:00

Kary Moss, Executive Director of the ACLU of Michigan, issued the following statement today in the wake of the recent killings of Philandro Castile and Alton Sterling by police and the sniper attacks on Dallas police officers yesterday: The frightening violence that has unfolded the past few days in Minnesota and Louisiana underscores the urgent need to address police violence and bias in our criminal justice system.

ACLU of Michigan Applauds Introduction of Legislation to End Racial Profiling

ACLU of Michigan Applauds Introduction of Legislation to End Racial Profiling

2001-05-31 00:00:00

DETROIT — As the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and as vice-chair of ALPACT, Advocates and Leaders for Police and Community Trust, a coalition of civil rights organizations, national, state and local law enforcement agencies, and community organizations that has been meeting for over two years on this issue, I applaud the introduction of Representative Buzz Thomas' legislation that will hopefully be the beginning of the end of racial profiling.

Conyers Moves to Stop Driving While Black Violations

Conyers Moves to Stop Driving While Black Violations

It’s called DWB — Driving While Black. And while it is not a crime, too many police officers treat it as if it were.

U.S. Rep. John Conyers, D-Detroit, and others say officers stop an unwarranted number of blacks and Hispanics for alleged traffic violations, hoping to find evidence of other criminal activity. The practice is known as racial profiling.

"We must stop the invidious practice of racial profiling. All citizens, regardless of their race, should be free to travel America's highways without undue harassment," Conyers said.

Driving While Black: What it is and Why it’s Important

Driving While Black: What it is and Why it’s Important

Almost every African-American or Latino can tell a story about being pulled over by the police for no apparent reason other than the color of his or her skin, especially if he or she happened to be driving in the "wrong place" at the "wrong time" or even driving the "wrong car." Victims of these racially motivated traffic stops rarely receive a traffic ticket or are found guilty of any violation of the law. It’s a practice called Driving While Black and it is emerging as a seminal civil rights issue.

DWB: What the ACLU is Doing

DWB: What the ACLU is Doing

The ACLU has established a national toll-free hotline to report incidents of racial profiling of motorists. Calling 1-877-6-PROFILE will allow callers to begin a registration process that will help the ACLU compile the statistical data it needs to fight Driving While Black violations. People who have been the victim of DWB violations in Michigan can download a complaint form now and mail it to the ACLU of Michigan.

No related cases
No related legislation
No related campaigns
Kary Moss, Executive Director of the ACLU of Michigan, issued the following statement today in the wake of the recent killings of Philandro Castile and Alton...
May 31, 2001 Driving While Black
DETROIT — As the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and as vice-chair of ALPACT, Advocates and Leaders for Police and...
Subscribe to RSS - Driving While Black